A GREAT D-760 Review and Shooting Report...UPDATED PICS!!

Customer Reviews of Night Vision Equipment

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A GREAT D-760 Review and Shooting Report...UPDATED PICS!!

Postby Clutch » Mon Nov 13, 2006 2:54 pm

Here is a great report from one of my customers on his D-760 with some great pics and kills! Thanks Jarret!

A couple of weeks ago Vic shipped me a D-760 Gen3 hand select and the new adjustable Torch. This is my first venture in night vision and I am very impressed. Vic is a great guy to work with and he is extremely helpful even if you are an engineer and ask thousands of questions. I do a lot of hog and coyote hunting in South Texas. This setup was built to help tip the balance at night. The D-760 and Torch are currently mounted on a JTAC Mk12Mod0 with an AAC M4-2000.

I finally setup my digital camera in manual mode to take decent pictures looking through the D-760. Looking through the scope in real life is much better than these pictures. Below are a few pictures I took tonight in the green belt/creek behind my house in a suburb of North Dallas. I can only imagine what my yuppie neighbors would have done had they seen me taking pictures through the rifle. “Hello SWAT officer, please put down your carbine, I can explain…”

As the pictures show, the D-760’s performance with and without the Torch is amazing. As I said in a previous post, the Torch is a must have if you own NV gear. Even with street lights and the D-760 gain control kicking in, the Torch is easily visible at 200+ yards. I’ll be heading to South Texas this weekend to hopefully test it out on moving targets. If the hogs and pasture poodles cooperate, I’ll post some real pictures next week.

Vic,
Thanks again for all of the help and providing excellent gear.

Gig’Em
Jarret



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Last edited by Clutch on Tue Dec 26, 2006 10:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Victor Di Cosola
Tactical Night Vision Company
http://www.tnvc.com
victor@tnvc.com
(909)796-7000
Clutch
 
Posts: 108
Joined: Wed Apr 13, 2005 6:26 pm

Postby Clutch » Mon Nov 13, 2006 3:01 pm

Here is Part II of Jarrets quest to rid the filed of yotes and hogs!! :D

Originally Posted By M40A5:
I finally got a chance to test the D-760 at my hunting lease in South Texas last weekend. I was able to hunt part of Thursday night and about 4 hours on Friday night before the rain started and never stopped. The entire trip was in near black out conditions with low clouds and drizzle. The Torch was invaluable in these conditions since it was extremely dark and most of the hunting is down narrow senderos in thick brush and trees. As I said in the previous post, I bought this system to tip the balance on hogs and coyote hunting at night. Instead of tipping the balance I think the scale fell off the table. This system is far more effective than I anticipated at dispatching hogs and coyotes. Before anyone gets upset at the carnage, please realize this area of South Texas is infested with wild hogs and the ranch owner would prefer we kill every last one. In the last two years three of us have taken 211 hogs with rifles and they are thicker this year than the first. It is a never ending battle, however night vision will definitely help. It is perfectly legal to hunt hogs at night with suppressors and bait(corn) in Texas. Deer hunting at night or with a suppressor is illegal in Texas.

I started hunting at one of our deer blinds on Thursday about 1 hour before dark. Around dark several bucks came in and started eating corn. Below are a couple of pictures of a young 10pt and 8pt. About 30 minutes after dark a group of small hogs came running in and chased the deer way. I tried to take a few pictures, but they immediately winded me and ran into the brush. I quickly put the camera down and started scanning the brush with the Torch. The Torch immediately revealed their eyes 130 yards away down a sendero behind the feeder. A couple of seconds later a 60lb sow(great eating) was lying on the ground with a large portion of her head missing. I went back to camp to clean the hog and decided to quickly coyote hunt from the bed of my truck overlooking a 100 acre pasture next to our camp house. Storms were brewing in the north and a front was about to hit so time was very limited. Honestly I did not think I had a chance in hell of doing any good with the lightening and erratic weather. Within 10 minutes of firing up the electronic caller(squealing piglet call), I saw a pair of eyes about 300 yards away running across the pasture toward my pickup. I stopped the caller and watched the yote with the Torch until she cleared the high grass for an easy shot at 80 yards. One shot to the neck and it was over. 15 minutes later the wind shifted and it started to rain.

Friday morning at dawn I hunted at a deer blind that is frequented by hogs. Shortly after the feeder went off two large boars came strolling in for a free meal. It took a while to get both lined up, but they finally crossed. A 180gr Barnes TSX handload fired from a Long Shot Rifles M40A1 300WinMag took care of business. The TSX went through the head of one boar and the chest of the 2nd without stopping. Penetration is not a problem with this bullet.

Friday night is where it got very interesting. About 2 hours before sunset I started hunting a 15’ elevated box blind overlooking a power line right of way with a lot of visibility. I hunted until dark with little activity. At dusk a few deer started to move around and I was able to take pictures of one small 8pt at about 200 yards. About 15 minutes after civil twilight the electronic caller started working its magic. A single coyote ran across the power line right of way and never stopped. A couple of minutes later a pack of 5 fawn munchers came running straight to the caller. I was able to kill the largest male, however the remaining four bolted before a follow-up shot. It took another hour and I finally called in a small yote which ate lead instead of pork. After shooting 2 yotes I decided to walk around in the brush hunting hogs. I had “road corned” several senderos earlier that day in this area. As animals cross the senderos they hit the corn and start eating. It works really well in holding animals in the open road. I planned a route down the senderos with the wind at my face for most of the walk. Within 5 minutes of walking I encountered 2 bucks eating corn. I was able to sneak up within 20 yards of them eating with a PVS-14. At that distance I started to get nervous that if they spooked they might run directly into me. I stomped my foot once to let them know where I was at and they ran. A couple of minutes later the unmistakable sound of hogs fighting and corn being crunched was easily heard. I found a large pack of hogs eating corn in a small clearing. I took a prone position and watched for a couple of minutes finding the largest boar in the group. Once he cleared I took an ear shot and it was over. I could have easily taken several follow-up shots on other running hogs, but did not want to track aggravated wounded hogs at night in the brush. The boar I dropped ended up weighing 252 lbs and was a beast. After taking a few pictures I walked another sendero and saw a lone boar feeding at 340 yards. I started a stalk and closed the gap to just over 120 yards before taking a shot and dropping him. I walked around for another hour and watched a lot of raccoons, skunks, and several more packs of small hogs. All of the remaining hogs were “eater hogs” and I did not want clean hogs that night. We normally clean boars under 80lbs or until they develop the stink. All sows are great to eat at any size. I packed the two boars into the jeep and made it back to the house shortly after midnight. The rest of the weekend was rained out. In three hunts the total was 5 hogs weighing 832 lbs and 3 yotes.

Several things I learned.

I will be calling Vic to buy another Torch. The Torch works extremely well at finding critter eyes. I’ll be mounting the 2nd Torch to my PVS-14 and use it for scanning. It is also a necessity in near black out conditions that I had this weekend.

After walking around while holding up the PVS-14 or D-760 I think I am going build a helmet mounted PVS-14 setup and a Torch mounted as pseudo headlamp. This would really help free up your hands and take the load off your shoulders from having to constantly raise the rifle up and down while scanning with the Torch.

You can use a laser range finder at night by following the laser in the D-760. It is sometimes challenging to find the dim dot, however it will provide an accurate range. If you are going to hunt an area before night, I recommend ranging objects and remembering the range while looking through the D-760. It is difficult to determine range with a NV scope due to the lack of depth perception.

Always wear your snake boots while walking around in South Texas at night. I was lucky and did not step on Mr. No-shoulders, however it is bound to happen when walking down corned roads with rodents everywhere.

Always verify your target and what is behind it before taking a shot at night. There are a lot of cattle and deer on this ranch and either one is a huge mistake to shoot at night.

Anyone with a suppressor knows it does not make shots “movie quiet” unless you use sub sonic ammo. 55gr sub sonic 223 is not a good idea for hunting 200+ lb boars for several reasons. A hypersonic 223 fired through a suppressor sounds like a 22LR crack. The crack follows the bullet as it goes down range. Sometimes this confuses the animals and they run toward you. Other times they scatter or just stand still. If you are lying prone on the ground be prepared for animals to come running at you. I almost made a self defense shot on a sow in the first pack as she came running toward me after knocking down the big boar. She veered about 15 yards out as I stood up.

Next time I go NV hunting I’ll try to get NV pictures of yotes and hogs. Yotes are very challenging due to their constant movement and my urge to pull the trigger. Hogs will be easy if I can find a group while sitting in a blind with a favorable wind direction. Trying to take pictures while stalking is nearly impossible due to the camera alignment and scope steadiness needed to get good pictures.

I had read several articles about NV effectiveness on predators at night. I was not completely convinced, however decided to jump in. I can personally vouch that NV gear is by far the most deadly weapon I have seen for taking coyotes. Both hogs and coyotes are primarily nocturnal and you can get away with a lot more movement at night as long as the wind is in your favor. I saw more coyotes using NV gear this trip than five times as many hours of day calling in the same areas. I am now going to get serious about predator calling at night. I’ll post updates as the pasture poodles get thinned out this winter.


Gig’Em
Jarret

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Victor Di Cosola
Tactical Night Vision Company
http://www.tnvc.com
victor@tnvc.com
(909)796-7000
Clutch
 
Posts: 108
Joined: Wed Apr 13, 2005 6:26 pm

Postby Clutch » Tue Dec 26, 2006 10:46 pm

..And da hits keep coming and coming from Jarret. You're racking em up with the 760 and torch! There is something to be said for a head mounted monoc and laser for quick snap shoots with close encounters! Glad the 760 worked out though!! :shock:

Also dually noted with da faint red glow all LED IR iluminators produce. Unless as you are withing 50 yards dead ahead you can the see the faint red glow. Off to two deg either side, very hard to see.

Originally Posted By M40A5:
Below are a few pictures from the last series of trips down to South Texas. Night vision hunting with the D-760 and Torch continues to be very effective at dispatching hogs and coyotes. I’m mixing up a combination of electronic caller stationary coyote hunting and stalking senderos spread with corn for hogs. I recently changed ARs around. I mounted the D-760 on a MSTN Mark12Mod1 type upper and put a Nightforce on the JTAC Mod0. The Mod1 LaRue 13.2 front end is easier to mount the Torch and slightly lighter for night hunting. The accuracy from both uppers is amazing. It sleeted last Friday morning after I shot a hog. This is a really rare event in South Texas, hence the picture to remember. Two years ago it snowed on Christmas day in South Texas, first time in 80 years.

I have noticed that some animals take notice when I activate the Torch at close range. I turned the Torch on and walked 50 yards away looking back at the rifle. The Torch emits a faint red glow. It does not seem to spook animals, however at close range they notice the movement when you move the rifle/Torch around.

I had another “Ohh-shit” kind of experience last Saturday night. I had already shot a nice sow on one sendero and walking back to the ATV. I scanned another sendero and noticed a herd of hogs about 500 yards down. The wind was quartering at my face and I had a good chance to stalk close enough for a shot. I started walking in very dark conditions (low clouds, and mist). Every hundred yards or so I would lift up the rifle and make sure I was closing the gap. I eventually made it within 100 yards and starting scanning for which hog I wanted to shoot. I identified several big sows and decided the largest was the target. The hogs were slow feeding away and I decided to get a little closer before making a shot. The sendero had tall grass and I would have to take a semi off-hand shot with the rifle resting on my knee. I walked a short distance and looked back through the D-760. As I started to scan I heard a bunch of noise and close! Looking through the D-760 I discovered the hogs had back tracked and now moving toward me. They were about 30 yards away and would probably notice me any second. I found the largest sow and put the cross hairs high between her eyes and squeezed off. At that close distance the scope was slightly out of focus and it was a best guess hurry up and pull kind of shot. To be honest I was a little surprised to see her crash and the herd exploded into the brush. At close range the POI is several inches low due to the scope to bore differential. Anyways it worked out and you can see the 223 entrance wound on the left hog’s head in the picture below. The first sow (145lbs) taken earlier that evening is the one on the right.

Gig’Em
Jarret


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Victor Di Cosola
Tactical Night Vision Company
http://www.tnvc.com
victor@tnvc.com
(909)796-7000
Clutch
 
Posts: 108
Joined: Wed Apr 13, 2005 6:26 pm


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